Kitsch

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Archaeological Kitsch

Wikipedia
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Archaeological items of iconic status can become the subject of modern copies and re-use of the imagery. New Zealand items are not immune.


Maori Rock Art

Rock drawings seem to have been particularly prone to this - borrowings appearing on fabrics, glassware, ceramics, postage stamps and even matchboxes.

O'Regan discusses this use in the context of cultural property[1].

A scarf with many images from rock art.
Scarves
Another scarf.
Another colourway.
Yet another.
And another.
Another scarf.
A further scarf.
   
Glasses
In the 1960s peanut butter was sold in packaging like these - which could be used as glasses after they were emptied.
Another one.
A variety.
Full set?
Enamelled Dishes
Enamelled dishes, central one labelled by CERAWARE.
Another enamelled dish.
Souvenir ware.
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Corporate advertising
In packaging
Reverse
Used in coasters
More
Stamps
Rock art used on a commemorative stamp
Rock art used on a definitive stamp
On an album cover
 
Fabric / Carpet
Rock art used on fabric. This was produced by blockprinting by poet Rex Fairburn. He obtained the artwork for this from Theo Schoon and reproduced using linocut blocks. Wikipedia has an article on Schoon. Another print can be seen here. Fairburn and Schoon have Dictionary of New Zealand Biography entries.
A wall hanging on fabric.
Feltex Rug, designed by Don Ramage 1972, featuring a Maori Rock Drawing inspired abstract figure.
Table mat with that taniwha again.
Another place mat
Tablecloth
Placemat
 
Ceramics
A rock art image often interpreted as an eagle used on a lamp base.
Dorothy Ewart pottery dish.
Another Dorothy Ewart pottery piece.
The stamp on a Crown Lynn dish - ultimate Kiwiana?. Some think so. In 2014 an example of this sold on Trademe for $110.
Matchboxes
A rock art image on a box of matches.
The back.
More matches.
Still more.
;
Furniture
Enamelled coffee table.
Another enamelled coffee table.
   
Wall Decorations Enamelled
Enamelled wall plaque.
   
Wall Decorations Copper
Copper wall plaque.
Another. Grosvenor Copperware
More
Still another
Wall Decorations Wood
Wooden wall plaque.
Another wooden piece.
That "Taniwha" again.
And again.
Another wooden wall plaque.
Yet another wooden piece.
Clothing
Women's top
 
Jewellery
Cuff Bracelet
Pendant
 

Maori Other

Someone's idea of a nephrite adze - for sale as a replica on TradeMe

Colonial

Barry Curtis Park in South Auckland has volcanic rock walls, reconstructed from a nearby farm site. The unfortunate result is what happens when landscape architecture captures archaeological reconstruction.


Reconstructed walls


The sign


Walls


Yet more walls

Not Quite Archaeological

An execrable souvenir of the 1940 Centennial Exhibition. A Birmingham made badge representing the Hinemoa and Tutanekai gateway at the Model Pa, Whakarewarewa. It doesn't include a kiwi! This sold for $113.99 on Trademe so its awfullness was certainly appreciated.The gateway itself is an example of bowdlerisation of Maori carving.
DC Comics at its best?


Moa were once used as icons - where Kiwi are today. This a WW1 reinforcement badge

References

  1. O'Regan, G. 2008 The shifting place of Ngai Tahu rock art. in Sue O'Connor, Geoffrey Clark, Foss Leach (Eds), Islands of inquiry : colonisation, seafaring and the archaeology of maritime landscapes. Terra Australis 29 Accessed at http://epress.anu.edu.au/terra_australis/ta29/pdf/ch26.pdf